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OCCASIONAL PAPERS

Additional Pages:

Occasional Papers are available by order. Please make check payable to Johns Hopkins University and send to:

Mrs. Amy Robie
Institute for Policy Studies
Johns Hopkins University
Wyman Building
3400 N. Charles Street
Baltimore, MD 21218-2688
Phone: 410-516-4613

Download the Order Form in PDF format

  1. American Competitiveness: Implications for the Port of Baltimore, Proceedings of the 11th Annual Johns Hopkins University and Maryland Port Administration Conference, September 19, 1988. (photocopy only) Click for Abstract
  2. High-Tech Firms in the Baltimore-Washington Corridor: Growth Factors, Spatial Patterns and Regional Development, by Roland Hahn, Professor of Geography, University of Stuttgart and Christine Wellems, August 1989. Click for Abstract
  3. Housing Assistance As a Route to Independence: A Case That Has Yet To Be Made, by Sandra J. Newman, Institute for Policy Studies, Johns Hopkins University, January 1990. Click for Abstract
  4. The Baltimore Region: A Changing Profile of the People and the Economy, by Charles W. McMillion, STET, August 1990. Click for Abstract
  5. Urban Education Reform: Lessons for Baltimore, Proceedings - May 17, May 31 and June 6, 1988 with Ernest L. Boyer, Robert Slavin, James McPartland and Henry Levin. Click for Abstract
  6. The Supervision of Juvenile Offenders in Maryland: Policy and Practice Implications of the Department of Juvenile Services Workload Study, by David M. Altschuler, Institute for Policy Studies, Johns Hopkins University, April 1991. (photocopy only) Click for Abstract
  7. Maryland State Fiscal Condition: An Overview for the 1990s, by Michael E. Bell, Institute for Policy Studies, Johns Hopkins University, April 1991. (photocopy only) Click for Abstract
  8. Maryland and the New World Economy: Challenges and Opportunities, by Lester M. Salamon, Institute for Policy Studies, Johns Hopkins University, November 1991. (photocopy only) Click for Abstract
  9. The Federal Budget and The Nonprofit Sector: FY 1992, by Lester M. Salamon, Institute for Policy Studies, Johns Hopkins University and Alan J. Abramson, The Urban Institute, December 1991. Click for Abstract
  10. Steps Toward Independence: Evaluating an Integrated Service Program for Public Housing Residents, by Anne B. Shlay, Institute for Policy Studies, Johns Hopkins University and C. Scott Holupka, December 1991. Click for Abstract
  11. Intensive Aftercare for High-Risk Juvenile Parolees: A Model Program Design, by David M. Altschuler, Institute for Policy Studies, Johns Hopkins University and Troy L. Armstrong, Associate Professor, California State University, Sacramento, Division of Criminal Justice, June 1992. Click for Abstract
  12. The Severely Mentally Ill Homeless: Housing Needs and Housing Policy, by Sandra J. Newman, Institute for Policy Studies, Johns Hopkins University, September 1992. Click for Abstract
  13. The Federal Budget and the Nonprofit Sector: FY 1993, by Lester M. Salamon, Institute for Policy Studies, Johns Hopkins University and Alan J. Abramson, The Urban Institute, Summer 1992. Click for Abstract
  14. The Marketization of Welfare: Changing Nonprofit and For-Profit Roles in the American Welfare State, by Lester M. Salamon, Institute for Policy Studies, Johns Hopkins University, January 1993. Click for Abstract
  15. The Global Associational Revolution: The Rise of the Third Sector on the World Scene, by Lester M. Salamon, Institute for Policy Studies, Johns Hopkins University, April 1993. Click for Abstract
  16. Towanda's Triumph: Social and Cultural Capital in the Urban Ghetto, by M. Patricia Fernandez Kelly, Institute for Policy Studies, Johns Hopkins University, August 1994. Click for Abstract
  17. Poverty Deconcentration As Policy Strategy, prepared by Introduction to Policy Analysis Students, Fall 1994, Master's Program in Policy Studies, Johns Hopkins University, February 1995. Click for Abstract
  18. Empowerment Zone Strategies for Baltimore: Lessons from Research and Experience, prepared by Introduction to Policy Analysis Students, Fall 1995, Master's Program in Policy Studies, Johns Hopkins University, February 1996. Click for Abstract
  19. The Third Route - Government-Nonprofit Collaboration in Germany and the United States, by Lester M. Salamon, Institute for Policy Studies, Johns Hopkins University and Helmut K. Anheier, Institute for Policy Studies, Johns Hopkins University, June 1996. Click for Abstract
  20. Demystifying Fluctuations in Crime Rates: A Comparative Analysis of Baltimore, Houston and New York, prepared by Introduction to Policy Analysis Students, Fall 1996, Master's Program in Policy Studies, Johns Hopkins University, April 1997. Click for Abstract
  21. Revitalizing Baltimore: An Assessment of Five Touted Urban Revitalization Strategies, prepared by Introduction to Policy Analysis Students, Fall 1998, Master's Program in Policy Studies, Johns Hopkins University, April 1999. Click for Abstract
  22. From the Lab to the Factory: The Future of Biotech Manufacturing in Maryland, by Maryann Feldman, Institute for Policy Studies, Johns Hopkins University and Cynthia Ronzio, October 1999. Click for Abstract
  23. Is the New Obsession with 'Performance Management' Masking the Truth About Social Programs? by Ann Bonar Blalock, Editor, Evaluation Forum, Office of Policy Research, U.S. Department of Labor and Burt Barnow, Ph.D., Institute for Policy Studies, Johns Hopkins University, November 1999. Click for Abstract
  24. Is There An 'Urban Revival' and What Does It Mean for Baltimore? prepared by Introduction to Policy Analysis Students, Fall 1999, Master's Program in Policy Studies, Johns Hopkins University, March 2000. Click for Abstract Click Here for Full Text
  25. The Contribution of Imports to Maryland Economic Growth, prepared by Marsha R.B. Schachtel, Maryann Feldman, Jennifer T. Comey and Michael J. Vincelette, Institute for Policy Studies, Johns Hopkins University, May 2000. Click for Abstract
  26. Neighborhoods Moving Up: What Baltimore Can Learn from Is Own Improving Neighborhoods, prepared by Introduction to Policy Analysis Students, Fall 2000, Master?s Program in Policy Students, Institute for Policy Studies, Johns Hopkins University, March 2001. Click for Abstract Click Here for Full Text
  27. Population Dynamics in Baltimore Neighborhoods: The Good, the Bad, and the Neutral, prepared by Introduction to Policy Analysis Students, Fall 2001, Master?s Program in Policy Students, Institute for Policy Studies, Johns Hopkins University, April 2002. Click for Abstract Click Here for Full Text
  28. Neighborhood Effects of Hope VI: Evidence From Baltimore, prepared by Introduction to Policy Analysis Students, Fall 2002, Master?s Program in Public Policy Students, Institute for Policy Studies, Johns Hopkins University, April 2003. Click for Abstract Click Here for Full Text
  29. Is Neighborhood Poverty a Good Marker for Neighborhood Quality? prepared by Introduction to Policy Analysis Students, Fall 2003, Master's Program in Policy Studies, IPS, Johns Hopkins University, May, 2004. Click for Abstract Click for Full Text
  30. Neighborhoods Left Behind in Baltimore's Housing Boom, prepared by Policy Analysis for the Real World Students, Fall 2005, Master's Program in Policy Studies, IPS, Johns Hopkins University, August, 2006. Click for Full Text
  31. Abandonment in Baltimore: Considerations for Public Investment Priorities, prepared by Policy Analysis for the Real World Students, Fall 2006, Master's Program in Policy Studies, IPS, Johns Hopkins University, September, 2007 Click for full text
  32. Mixed-Income Neighborhoods:  Theories Meet Realities in Baltimore, prepared by Policy Analysis for the Real World Students, Fall 2007, Master's Program in Public Policy, IPS, Johns Hopkins University, September, 2008  Click for Full Text